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20121202
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be interesting, though. if vice president biden runs, which has been speculated about, there will be a real conundrum, and i think there's a conundrum for the democratic establishment if secretary clinton goes there. a lot of people feel that she would really be able to get the support of the big democratic donors and traditional parts of democratic party but not be able to bring along new parts of obama coalition, hence the gay marriage sticking point. 2016 is definitely wide open. hillary clinton was referred to me recently by an operative on the democratic side, very involved in the early jockeying says she's the 800-pound gorilla. if she goes the field is not necessarily hers for the taking, but she would have a significant advantage coming into the race. >> when the former president is asked if his wife will run, he always says he has no idea. is there any indication behind the scenes that she's either annoyed, flattered or feels pressure as so many people -- the election wasn't even over, and everyone had their list of republicans running. of course, her name has always been there for
this week and has a fund-raiser scheduled in the washington suburbs and that vice president joe biden has been meeting with his donors. and david wrote, hillary clinton is running for president. he came to that conclusion after attending a forum in washington where hillary clinton was a featured speaker and was introduced by what remnick calls a short, adoring film. the film was like an international endorsement four years in advance of the iowa caucus and the new hampshire primary. >> if you bet on the side of human rights, human dignity, more countries may have the same extraordinary good fortune that we've had. ♪ and when you smile >> someone who knows a thing or two about political comebacks, i can tell you i don't think we've heard the last of hillary clinton. ♪ girl you're amazing just the way you are ♪ >> i just have an instinct that the best is yet to come. >> joining me now, "the washington post" philip rucker and jonathan capehart. >> come on, these leaving her term as secretary of state. she's arguably been one of the best that we've had in a while. she's loved by clearly
of the good things about a choice when you had bill clinton pick al gore, when you had obama pick biden even when you had bush and cheney, they all, in their own way had their chemistry. but they also bring something to a ticket. or more important they do no harm. so they don't change the their at this. they don't change the essence of the message. so when cheney was picked, people might have said is he picking his daddy's friend or someone so old to help him. those are -- that could slap down a candidate but it doesn't change your whole thrust of your main selling point which was for romney, i could be a better steward of the economy than obama. so when -- you evaluate what happened yes so it was a great chemistry. >> bill: right. but politically -- again, it changed the focus of the campaign and then what did -- what did paul ryan bring? he didn't bring wisconsin. so you ended up with two candidates. had born in or lived in and paul ryan couldn't deliver either. >> here's the other thing. i think this is why these
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3

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